Entrepreneurs – Be Who You Needed When You We’re Younger

Not many entrepreneurs realise that signing up to work for yourself often means you’ll be working by yourself as well. Even entrepreneurs who hire teams to work with them claim that it’s lonely at the top.

Lonely.

God, the word sounds pathetic. It’s not the first thing that comes to mind when pondering the entrepreneur. In fact, I don’t believe I’ve read any articles specifically about loneliness and the entrepreneur, yet I believe it’s a reality that exists ubiquitously. I know it certainly exists for me.

Most people think of owners and CEOs as hard driving, autonomous, tough and energetic – some sort of mini-masters of the universe; and some of my successful business peers are that, in their very different ways. However, I believe there is a closeted yearning in most of us to connect communally, safely, discretely…

Vulnerably.

Friendships, for entrepreneurs, are hard. We’re busy. Most of us have primary commitments to our families and homes in our little free time and we can’t even keep up current friendships. Most of our human contact is within our own direct networks and it is simply not practicable to have real, open, intimate friendships with employees, even your top executives. Being a boss supposedly requires a certain ‘distance’.

Not many entrepreneurs realise that signing up to work for yourself often means you’ll be working by yourself as well. Even entrepreneurs who hire teams to work with them claim that it’s lonely at the top.

It can be tough sometimes, being a solo-entrepreneur.

Being an entrepreneur today is often not quite the same as entrepreneurs from days of old, who pioneered actual bricks and mortar developments and were surrounded by the teams of people.

In this age of entrepreneurs using the web to map out their own career and financial destinies, they are often flying solo while they do it. Sure some have one or two people they might work with on a regular basis, but usually the bulk of their work is done alone.

A side effect of working alone all the time is that it can get, well…pretty lonely.

Related: 9 Tips on How to Deal With Your Startup Blues

While alone time can be great when you’re on a productive or creative streak and need to get things done, it can also be extremely unhealthy if you aren’t careful and don’t make an effort to connect with other people and put yourself out into the real world.

People need people, whether they realise it or not.

Many entrepreneurs often have a large online network of ‘friends’which they connect and interact with regularly.

However this is not the same thing as getting yourself out into the real world around actual people and the hustle and bustle of everyday life. Working from home and playing with all your Facebook friends just wont cut it.

You have got to pick up the phone. Call the right people. You know you have a few people you should NEVER call about your business worries. I know I do. Those are the people who really don’t understand what you do, don’t believe it will work, or would actually enjoy seeing you fail.

Maybe they are jealous. Whatever – stop calling them when you need a leg-up out of the dumps.  It won’t help.

Instead, call a mentor. Call another business owner.  Go to a networking event and meet someone new. Share what you fear most with someone else who in their own way has experienced your journey even if you have to research the topic to engage in the comment section of one of their articles. Use your social media platforms in a positive way.

But remember this – you have to nurture your support system. You must also be a support to the people who are in your network. Choose carefully.

2017-09-28T10:08:19+00:00By Amir Hussein|Entrepreneurship|

About the Author: Amir Hussein

Founder & Master of Occasions at InAnyEvent London. I am on a mission to generate ripples that are felt in the ocean of social culture, and create an eternal legacy of impossibly perfect events that make your everyday ordinary, extraordinary.

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